Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics |

Tag as favorite
AAMC SB
Moiz_6047
#1 Posted : Thursday, July 29, 2021 11:59:24 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 5/3/2021
Posts: 51

Thanks: 0 times
Was thanked: 0 time(s) in 0 post(s)
Q52) I understand the logic for this question but isn't 360nm not considered part of the Visible spectrum?


SB Question: The relationship between the steroid hormone, estrogen, and the peptide hormone, insulin, is being investigated. In order to quantify levels of each of these hormones, tissue samples were homogenized and then placed in a mixture of 2:1 hexane/water. What is the expected result from this extraction method?

I understand the concept of like dissolving like, but for proteins we often need to protonate/deprotonate them to get them to go to the aqueous layer. Why does the insulin not need to be charged here to go to the aqueous phase.
INSTR_Molly_129
#2 Posted : Saturday, July 31, 2021 9:16:45 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 5/23/2021
Posts: 74

Thanks: 0 times
Was thanked: 0 time(s) in 0 post(s)
Hi Moiz,

360 nm is very close to approaching UV. But looking at this question, I would focus on the two different numbers being provided here than trying to memorize the ranges. 200 nm is definitely uv range, and the key here is that the compound was yellow. So, I'm looking for absorbance at a purple wavelength. What is more likely to be purple? 200 or 360?

Peptide hormones are non-polar, and cannot easily transfer into the cell form the cellular membrane (requiring channels). Therefore, it does not need base/acid to encourage it to enter the aqueous phase.

Hope that helps,

Molly
Users browsing this topic
Guest
Tag as favorite
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Clean Slate theme by Jaben Cargman (Tiny Gecko)
Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2009, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.070 seconds.