Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics |

Tag as favorite
Thermodynamics
Arkadiy_6846
#1 Posted : Friday, July 09, 2021 2:10:04 AM
Rank: Newbie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 6/8/2021
Posts: 1

Thanks: 0 times
Was thanked: 0 time(s) in 0 post(s)
Why is Fluorine considered to have weak London dispersion forces?
INSTR_Molly_129
#2 Posted : Friday, July 09, 2021 10:54:08 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 5/23/2021
Posts: 74

Thanks: 0 times
Was thanked: 0 time(s) in 0 post(s)
Hi Arkadiy,

In general, the more electrons present, the more chances there will be for an atom to exhibit temporary dipole moments, resulting in higher london dispersion force.

Since fluorine is so small and has very little electrons, plus its electrons are so tightly held due to its high electronegativity, its going to have a low london dispersion force. This actually explains why we find F2 to be in gaseous phase while I2 exists in solid phase. A stronger intermolecular force allows for the compound to be better connected to one another and stay in solid phase, while weak intermolecular forces means that molecules of the same compound does not adhere as easily with each other, and will generally favour gaseous forms.

I hope that that helps. Let me know if you have any more questions!

Cheers and happy studying,

Molly
Users browsing this topic
Guest
Tag as favorite
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Clean Slate theme by Jaben Cargman (Tiny Gecko)
Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2009, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.078 seconds.