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Vasodilation and blood pressure
fcsudirga
#1 Posted : Saturday, August 18, 2018 1:29:37 AM
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Vasodilation in blood vessels typically reduce blood pressure (which is what vasodilation drugs are sometimes used for). This is different from ideal fluid theory, which predicts that pressure decreases as area decreases. Is this solely because blood is not ideal fluid or is there something else at play? If the answer is not too long winded, I would appreciate if you can demonstrate it with some equations.
INSTR_Amira_87
#2 Posted : Sunday, June 07, 2020 6:03:02 PM
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Hello! Thank you for the question! The reason vasodilation decreases blood pressure is because of the reduced surface area causing friction at the walls of the vessels (for non ideal systems, recall that increased surface area = increased resistance = increased pressure). The relationship can be modelled as Q=∆P/R where ∆P is the change in pressure, R is the resistance, and Q is flow rate (which much remain constant).
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