Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics |

Tag as favorite
glutamate vs. glutamic acid
Nicole_5521
#1 Posted : Thursday, July 08, 2021 2:14:01 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 4/30/2020
Posts: 71

Thanks: 0 times
Was thanked: 0 time(s) in 0 post(s)
Hi,

I'm wondering if glutamate is commonly used to refer to the glutamic acid amino acid? I've noticed that it shows up in questions sometimes.

Thanks!
INSTR_Kennedy_135
#2 Posted : Thursday, July 08, 2021 8:25:44 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 5/14/2021
Posts: 56

Thanks: 0 times
Was thanked: 0 time(s) in 0 post(s)
Hello Nicole,

Glutamate is the ionic form of glutamic acid. When glutamic acid, which is acidic, loses a hydrogen from its side chain, it becomes glutamate, with a side chain composed of CH2CH2COO. In the human body, glutamic acid almost always exists as glutamate, because conditions in the body favor the loss of the hydrogen atom from glutamic acid.

Hope this helps!
Users browsing this topic
Guest
Tag as favorite
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Clean Slate theme by Jaben Cargman (Tiny Gecko)
Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2009, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.066 seconds.